Home Tournaments Calendar Weather Merchandise Sponsors

Go Back   Spearboard.com - The World's Largest Spearfishing Diving Boating Social Media Forum > General Topics (Non-regional) > Technical Spearfishing

Technical Spearfishing Technical Scuba diving is generally defined as going deeper than 130 feet. You must have the proper training for this extreme aspect of spearfishing.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 17 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 08-25-2013, 04:33 PM   #1
SpearMax
Forum Administrator
 
SpearMax's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 15,827
Arrow Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

There has been a thread about this incident posted already by John at this link:

Testing your breathing Gases Prior to Diving

I searched for the latest information on the incident and am now posting in the technical diving section of Spearboard for future reference my board members. Perhaps something can be learned from this incident and extra effort of caution can be made by any of us who are doing dives with any deco gas present.

Here at this link and attached below is the pdf of an accident report by one dive council group:

http://www.underwatercouncil.com/dow...ON_in_2013.pdf

And here is a Huffpo blog report here:

Death in The Devil: The Dangers of Cave Diving

The victim was this fellow:

Quote:
Carlos Fonseca – President of Great Lakes Technical Divers

Carlos Fonseca has turned diving into a lifestyle. His dedication has brought him many great moments, as well as great friendships. Passion for exploration and search of the unknown has brought him to GLTD, allowing that dream to continue. Carlos is an active Trimix Diver, Full Cave Diver, Sidemount Full Cave Diver and many others. Some of his latest accomplishments include receiving the NACD Wakulla award and his leadership with establishing GLTD as Co-Producers of the We Are Water Project.

Source: http://www.gltdivers.com/?page_id=222


May Carlos rest in eternal peace.



Here is the text of the linked council report and their recommendations:

Date of Incident: 2013-08-08

Summary:


There was a fatal accident in a cave in Florida on Thursday August 8th, 2013. Carlos Fonseca, a resident of Caledon, Ontario, was diving in the Devil’s Eye cave system, part of Ginnie Springs in Florida. Mr. Fonseca had been diving for about four years and was Full Cave trained, Trimix certified, and Sidemount Full Cave trained. He was a Wakulla Award recipient for having conducted safe cave dives.

Mr. Fonseca was preparing an aluminum 80 cubic foot tank that was permanently and clearly marked with “O2” (oxygen) and “MOD 20” (Maximum Operating Depth 20 feet) as a stage bottle to 90 feet in order to extend his penetration distance into the cave. His team mates observed that the victim was about to use an oxygen bottle for a greater depth than it was considered to be safe for, and questioned him about it. The oxygen bottle was intended to be used down to a maximum operating depth of 20 feet, as marked by the victim. Mr. Fonseca, who had a full mix/blend station at home, replied that he had filled the bottles himself and knew that the bottle was filled with air.

Mr. Fonseca’s team mates repeated their concern about the bottle in question and the victim insisted that he knew it was air. Mr. Fonseca’s computer was also set for air. No one had observed Mr. Fonseca analyze that tank that morning. The team continued to prepare for the dive and discussed the dive plan, reviewed the map and made contingency and emergency plans to turn the dive if necessary. Mr. Fonseca proposed to not make any visual jumps during the dive, which refers to crossing a gap between the main permanent guideline and where a branch line begins, without a gap spool.

The team entered the Devil Springs cave system through the Eye, in the Santa Fe River. They went upstream about 400 feet and were about 1/3 of the way between the “park bench” and “Hill 400”, when Mr. Fonseca began having a seizure and then lost consciousness. The partial pressure of oxygen was about 3.6 at the depth of about 85 feet, causing oxygen toxicity.

His teammates decided to bring the victim to exit through the Ear, going through a wide passageway known as the Gallery, passing one restriction, and with a direct, easier path out than back through the Eye. The teammates were watching Mr. Fonseca’s face as they pulled him along for the 20 minute, challenging exit from the cave, ensuring that his nose was pinched, his regulator was in his mouth, and observing whether he was breathing.

Mr. Fonseca began breathing at two points on the way out of the cave as well as at the surface prior to possible cardiac arrest. As the group surfaced and shouted for help, other divers, including cave instructors, assisted in getting Mr. Fonseca to the shore and commenced CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation). Mr. Fonseca was transported alive to the hospital where he was later pronounced dead.

A cave instructor who took part in the rescue attempt later analyzed the tanks in the presence of members of the sheriff’s department. The single stage bottle was analyzed to be 98% oxygen. The partial pressure of oxygen was about 3.5 at the point of the seizure at a depth of about 85 feet, causing oxygen toxicity. The back-mounted double steel tanks were analyzed as having 30% oxygen.

OUC Recommendations:

- Always follow all rules and protocols that you were trained for

- Always analyze the oxygen and other contents of every tank every time

- Always analyze a tank immediately prior to diving

- Always fill a tank only with what it is labeled as; ie) only O2 in a tank labeled O2

- Know and adhere to the maximum operating depth of a gas

- During the dive, always verify the content and MOD of the tank you are about to switch to, have the team mates verify the tank, and then make the gas switch if it is correct

- If a team member will not follow protocols, refuse to partake in the dive

- If any team member is uncomfortable with the process that is occurring, refuse to partake in the dive until and unless protocols are followed ie) a gas is analyzed and appropriate

- Avoid complacency in all parts of the process

- Visual jumps, even very familiar ones, are not recommended, and can complicate orientation with the stress and task loading of a rescue attempt


.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Carlos Death Incident Report Ginnie Springs 2013.pdf (107.2 KB, 354 views)

Last edited by SpearMax; 08-25-2013 at 04:49 PM.
SpearMax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2013, 04:43 PM   #2
Marcus
Naval gazer extraordinair
 
Marcus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 35,060
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Such an easily avoidable death. Hopefully somebody learns from this. Stay humble everyone.
__________________
"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." ~Jefferson
Marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2013, 05:07 PM   #3
waterpirate
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 139
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Check, re-check, and verify all bottles prior to dive. NEVER dive a mismarked bottle, duct tape and a sharpie marker to " write out loud " is on sale at lowes right now. Another tragic loss that prolly was preventable by himself or team mates.
Eric
waterpirate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2013, 07:25 PM   #4
Birdman
Registered User
 
Birdman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 415
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

What does oxygen 3.5 at 85ft so oxygen toxicity occurred mean? Sorry I just freedive.
Birdman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2013, 11:34 AM   #5
FreediveTrasm
DeepDivingTrasm
 
FreediveTrasm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: So Cal
Age: 29
Posts: 7
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdman View Post
What does oxygen 3.5 at 85ft so oxygen toxicity occurred mean? Sorry I just freedive.
It means that the partial pressure of Oxygen was a 3.5 atmospheres. PADI has a max partial pressure of O2 of 1.6-1.8 before you have O2 toxicity which basically means that your nervous system will shut down and your will start having a seizure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_toxicity
__________________
"The best way to observe a fish, is to become a fish" JYC
FreediveTrasm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2013, 04:06 PM   #6
NOOB
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: St Louis
Age: 38
Posts: 75
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreediveTrasm View Post
It means that the partial pressure of Oxygen was a 3.5 atmospheres. PADI has a max partial pressure of O2 of 1.6-1.8 before you have O2 toxicity which basically means that your nervous system will shut down and your will start having a seizure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_toxicity
Pretty much sums it up. I hate to hear about this. We learned even in Nitrox that always visualize the test of the % of 02 yourself and always make sure its marked accordingly.
NOOB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2013, 11:38 AM   #7
Samik
Nature Laughs Last
 
Samik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Vernon, BC
Posts: 688
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Such an easily avoidable tragedy.

"Mr. Fonseca had been diving for about four years" wow, for all that training he was very new to the sport.
__________________
Oiled Teak & Neoprene
Samik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2013, 01:52 PM   #8
speargunnoob
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
Posts: 19
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

I wonder why his dive computer didnt pick it up since it was set at regular air? Maybe it just didnt have the detection part. But an easily avodable problem always triple check your gear even if you are sure its better to be safe than sorry.
speargunnoob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2013, 08:30 PM   #9
ReefGuy
Registered User
 
ReefGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Punta Gorda, Fl
Posts: 913
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Quote:
Originally Posted by speargunnoob View Post
I wonder why his dive computer didnt pick it up since it was set at regular air? Maybe it just didnt have the detection part. But an easily avodable problem always triple check your gear even if you are sure its better to be safe than sorry.
Your computer does not know what your breathing gas is. It is up to you to analyze it and program the computer. The key here is to ALWAYS analyze your breathing gas, if you are using mixed gasses. And always use proper marks on the bottle.
ReefGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2013, 08:42 PM   #10
speargunnoob
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
Posts: 19
Re: Tech Diver Death of Carlos Fonseca - Ginnie Springs, FL 8-11-13

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReefGuy View Post
Your computer does not know what your breathing gas is. It is up to you to analyze it and program the computer. The key here is to ALWAYS analyze your breathing gas, if you are using mixed gasses. And always use proper marks on the bottle.
Ahh my buddie must have his programmed used it a few times.
speargunnoob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:36 AM.


The World's Largest Spearfishing Diving Social Media Forum Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2002 - 2014 Spearboard.com